Wearable Device Does Not Change Hand Hygiene Compliance Among Healthcare Workers
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Wearable Device Does Not Change Hand Hygiene Compliance Among Healthcare Workers

The technology must be further developed and tested to improve hand hygiene compliance.  By: Samara Rosenfeld  The use of an electronic wearable device did not change hand hygiene compliance among healthcare workers, according to the findings of a new study. Still, the technology increased the duration of hand rubbing and the volume of alcohol-based handrub…

Rise in data breaches wreaking havoc on small businesses
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Rise in data breaches wreaking havoc on small businesses

Be sure your data is secure! Learn more at https://mymeducator.com/. Data breaches not only hurt consumers, but are an expensive nightmare for small businesses, a new study reports. “Twenty-one percent of small businesses reported a data breach within the last 24 months, up by 17% from two years ago. A full 41% of small businesses…

Data sharing is key to innovation in health care
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Data sharing is key to innovation in health care

To improve people’s quality of life and prevent disease, health systems worldwide need to embrace digital platforms. Health is a highly precious state of life, which enables individuals to fulfill themselves, unlimited by anything but their will and environment. Maintenance of health is a costly pursuit, as health-care spending is projected to reach over $10…

Drug trial in Scotland offers new hope to women with ovarian cancer
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Drug trial in Scotland offers new hope to women with ovarian cancer

Standard treatment for ovarian cancer involves surgery and chemotherapy. Woman battling ovarian cancer could quadruple their chances of responding to treatment and halve their risk of relapse, thanks to a new drug trial conducted at Edinburgh University. Trametinib has been used in a clinical randomised trial of women with low grade serous ovarian cancer. Experts…

Artificial DNA can control release of active ingredients from drugs
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Artificial DNA can control release of active ingredients from drugs

TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY OF MUNICH (TUM) IMAGE: DIFFERENT KINDS OF NANOPARTICLES ARE BOUND TOGETHER BY DNA FRAGMENTS AND CEREN KIMNA RELEASED AT SPECIFIC TIMES. SUCH CONNECTIONS MAY BECOME THE BASIS OF DRUGS THAT RELEASE THEIR ACTIVE INGREDIENTS… view more  CREDIT: CEREN KIMNA / TUM A drug with three active ingredients that are released in sequence at…